School Library

Welcome to the School Library Page!

The National Curriculum only makes non-statutory suggestions in relation to library use but we at Broadstone Hall have chosen to adhere to these for the benefit of our pupils.

These are:

Y3/4 Non-statutory: Pupils should also have opportunities to exercise choice in selecting books and be taught how to do so, with teachers making use of any library services and expertise to support this.

Y5/6 Non-statutory: The skills of information retrieval that are taught should be applied, for example in reading history, geography and science textbooks, and in contexts where pupils are genuinely motivated to find out information [for example, reading information leaflets before a gallery or museum visit or reading a theatre programme or review]. Teachers should consider making use of any library services and expertise to support this.

As such, at Broadstone Hall each class has an opportunity to borrow a book from our school library at least every fortnight. Prior to the library re-opening each academic year, each class receives a refresher class on how to use the library where they are reminded of the skills they will need in order to locate a particular non-fiction book or particular fictional author. Further, during this session pupils are encouraged to borrow a range of reading texts to ensure access to a broad knowledge base across a range of literary genres, particularly those connected to the topics they are studying in their own lessons.

As is integral in all we do at Broadstone Hall, library use promotes our core values of resilience, independence, co-operation and confidence.

Accessing more challenging and varied library texts encourages children to persevere in reading a text, notwithstanding challenging vocabulary and unfamiliar genre styles. Moreover, resilience is needed in locating books using book reference numbers and author surnames.

Independence is key to successful library use with children bearing the responsibility of taking care of their book for a fortnight and returning it in good condition by a deadline to avoid incurring a library fine.

Co-operation is essential to a smooth running library. As is set out to them in their refresher session each academic year, all pupils are expected to co-operate with the expectations of the library from returning books to their rightful place when browsing, returning books to their class teacher in a timely manner and treating the books with respect. Additionally, a selection of upper key stage two pupils are given the role of librarian where they co-operate as a team to collect and return scanned library books to the shelves, maintain an orderly library and tidy the home reading book boxes.

A building of pupil confidence is what we strive for in regular library use. Regular library use improves confidence in reading itself and confidence in locating the book they desire. We hope this in turn will lead to a life-long enjoyment in reading for pleasure. Pupils who read widely for pleasure are also more likely to feel confident in tackling curriculum reading objectives in their classwork and assessments and in making connections across subjects and life experiences.

Mrs Orndal.

 

 

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